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Monthly Archives: September 2019

  1. The Secret Behind Blue Colour Changing Gins

    There are now over 300 different being made in Scotland and amongst them are a growing number of colour changing gins.

    We’re going to explore our favourite Scottish blue colour changing gins and the magical botanicals that give them their colour changing properties.

    Behind each of the blue colour changing gins is a floral botanical which is included in the botanical blend. The inclusion of the flowers gives the gins their blue hue and also create the theatre of changing colour. The change happens when adding an acidic ingredient such as tonic water. The gins will go from the blue to a delicate lilac/pink colour.

    Butterfly Pea Gins

    Butterfly pea is an Asian botanical which has been used for many years in Asian cooking as well as in teas.

    McLean’s Something Blue Gin

    Something Blue Gin was first lau

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  2. Boozy Baking with Craft56° - Gin, Tonic & Orange Cupcakes

    With the hints of an Indian Summer we've been experiencing in Glasgow this week the next in our Boozy Baking series saw us attempt some refreshing Gin, Tonic & Orange cupcakes.

    Boozy Baking with Craft56

    We used a combination of Ellis No.3 Butterfly Pea Gin and Cushiedoos quinine-free Scottish Tonic Water to make our cupcakes. We love the deep, earthy floral tones in the gin which complements orange well. As Cushiedoos tonic is quinine-free it's not as bitter as other botanicals so knew it would also work well in the recipe.

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  3. September 2019's Gin of the Month - Drookit Piper Gin

    Our chosen gin of the month for the gin club members this month is the newly launched Drookit Piper Gin from Pixel Spirits.

    Given the weather we've experienced this summer, it only seemed right that to mark the end of summer we featured a gin that takes its name from the Scots word 'Drookit' which means absolutely soaked or drenched, a fairly regular occurrence in the area of Scotland where the distillery is based!

    The Distillery

    The Pixel Spirits distillery is based in the grounds of the scenic Loch Leven Hotel in North Ballachulish in the north west highlands. Craig and Noru Innes, a husband and wife team, converted a barn into their micro-distillery which houses Orsetta (meaning Little Bear), the i-still that helps Craig produce the tasty liquids in batches of less than 100 bottles. Craig and Noru have recently converted another outbuilding to house the Pixel Spirits Gin School where you can create your own bottle of gin.

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  4. Top 10 Facts About (Scottish) Gin

    Here in Scotland we have a proud history of producing quality spirits. For many years Scotland has been synonymous with whisky and while our whisky is still second to none, over the past few years we've seen the dramatic emergence of Scottish Gin as a category in its own right.

    Take a look at our top facts about gin (and Scottish gin) that will impress even the most knowledgeable gin connoisseur!

    1. The name gin is a shortened form of genever which is derived from juniperus, the Latin name for the juniper berry

    2. Juniper berries are not actually a berry, they are a fleshy seed cone. Aside from use in gin production, juniper berries are commonly used as a spice in European cuisine.

    Juniper Berries

    3. The mass appeal of gin dates back to the 17th century when the Dutch used it as a medicine. However, the earliest k

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